Gombert

WEEK 34: Jonathan H. Gombert

The theme for this week’s 52 Ancestors Challenge is to write about an ancestor who appeared on any of the United States NonPopulation Schedules. I have decided to focus on my 4th great-uncle, Jonathan Gombert, who appeared in the 1890 Veterans Schedule, along with his brother, Aaron Gombert.

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Jonathan was born on June 19, 1835 in Mahoning Township, Carbon County, Pennsylvania. He was the youngest child born to Phillip and Sarah (Hoffman) Gombert.

In the Spring of 1861, the United States found itself within the Civil War. Jonathan heeded the call and on August 22, 1861, he enlisted in the Pennsylvania 81st Infantry Regiment. In September of 1862, Jonathan and his Company were fighting in the Battle of Antietam, Maryland. Jonathan was among the severely wounded at the end of the battle, having his right arm shot off.

Yet, Jonathan lived and returned home to the Mahoning Valley. He married Anna Hontz and had several children. He would serve Carbon as the Sheriff in 1900, a prison warden in addition to owning a large farm in the area of Mahoning Township known as Pleasant Corners.

Jonathan died on January 16, 1911 at his home. He is buried in the St. John’s Church Cemetery in Mahoning Township.

WEEK 33: Ulysses S. Gombert

After weeks of being behind, I think I am finally caught up on my posts for the 52 Ancestor Challenge. This week’s theme is “Defective, Dependent, & Delinquent” which focuses on any ancestor that may have been included in a special census taken in 1880 for he blind, deaf, paupers, homeless children, prisoners, insane, and idiotic.

Sadly, my 3rd great uncle, Ulysses Gombert, was included in this census. Ulysses was born December 27, 1868 in Mahoning Township, Carbon County, PA to Aaron Gombert and Lucy Hontz. He was the youngest child – and only male – out of 5 children.

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In 1880, Ulysses was 11 years old. According to the Defective, Dependent, and Delinquent Schedule, Ulysses was determined “idiotic” since he was 4 years old. Ulysses was diagnosed with epilepsy and suffered from convulsions. This was determined to be the cause for his idiotic state.

Ulysses died on December 2, 1904 in Mahoning Township, a year after his mother, Lucy, had passed away. His obituary in the December 9, 1904 issue of The Lehighton Press was very short:

Pleasant Corner Chatter. Ulysses Gombert, 36 years old, an invalid all his life, died at noon Friday. He is survived these sisters: Mrs. Frank Moser, Mrs Levi Geiger, Mrs. Wilson Weaver and Miss Rena, all of Mahoning. The funeral was held on Tuesday afternoon with interment at St. John’s cemetery, Rev. Strauss officiating.

5. Aaron Gombert – What I learned from Civil War pension files

This week in my post for the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge, I have decided to focus on my 3rd great grandfather, Aaron Gombert, who was a Civil War veteran. He was also a classic example of how much you can learn just from Civil War pension papers.

One day I logged into my online tree on Ancestry.com and saw a leaf shaking above his name. Up until this point, I knew very little about Aaron. Only that he was about 1832 in Pennsylvania, he was a farmer in the Mahoning Valley in Carbon County, Pennsylvania, living there with wife, Lucy and their 5 children. It turned out to be a hint that Aaron was listed in the 1890 Veterans Schedule. From this document I learned that Aaron had served as a Private with the 132nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment from August 18, 1862 until May 24, 1863. It also stated that he had contracted typhoid fever during that time.

Civil War Pension papers of Aaron H. Gombert

Physical description of Aaron H. Gombert.

Some more searching on Ancestry, yielded his name in the Civil War Pension Index. From there, I was able to request his papers from the National Archives. A thick packet showed up a few weeks later. It was filled with a wealth of facts. I was able to get his birth date, and his date of death. It also gave a physical description of him: 5′ 8″, light complexion and red hair. Yes, it turns out my 3rd great grandfather was a ginger!

I was also able to get documentation of his marriage to my 3rd great-grandmother, Lucy Hontz. This was very difficult information to obtain, since the nearby church did not have the record. It turned out they were married on February 5, 1854 by the Rev. C.G. Eichenberg,  a pastor, who served several churches in the area.

Verfication of marriage between Aaron Gombert and Lucy Ann Hontz.

Verfication of marriage between Aaron Gombert and Lucy Ann Hontz.

There were also some details about his service. Aaron had fought with his regiment in the Battle of Antietam, Maryland on September 17, 1862. After that battle was won, they arrived in Harper’s Ferry and camped there. Around October 1, 1862, Aaron became sick with typhoid fever and was sent first to the regiment hospital in Harper’s Ferry, then to Frederick City Hospital, Maryland where he remained for 2 months. When he recovered he was sent back to fight with is regiment until he was mustered out in May 1863.

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Aaron seemed to have been plagued with the after effects of the typhoid fever for years after his discharge. His back pain eventually led him to become totally incapacitated and he could no longer farm his land. Aaron died August 9, 1900 and is buried in the Saint John’s Church cemetery in the Mahoning Valley.

His wife, Lucy, kept collecting his pension until her death on September 26, 1903. Another date that I had verified from the pension files.

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